Home Mexican Food Chicken with Pipian Rojo Day Of The Dead Recipe

Chicken with Pipian Rojo Day Of The Dead Recipe

by Karl

At midnight on Nov. 1, Dia de Los Muertos begins. It is a significant day on the Mexican calendar, and a holiday that is widely misunderstood in the United States.

First things first: It has nothing to do with Halloween. It’s a family time, joyful and uplifting, its own celebration. It’s probably too late to put this skull-faced genie back in the bottle, but some Mexican Americans feel it’s disrespectful to wear or celebrate anything to do with Day of the Dead on Halloween, or to incorporate the two. (The upcoming Disney/Pixar movie, “Coco,” which includes a young boy’s journey in the “Land of the Dead,” is set for Oct. 27 release in Mexico but has a deliberately delayed release date of Nov. 22 in the United States for this reason, according to bloggers invited to press events.)

Chicken with Pipian Rojo

Authentic Mexican Recipe

Dia de Los Muertos runs through Nov. 2. It is when the souls of the dead are invited back to reunite with their loved ones in the land of the living. The first night, Nov. 1, is for children who have died, and Nov. 2 is for adults. The holiday affirms that death is part of the cycle of life; it is not to be feared. It is not sad or scary.

At midnight on Nov. 1, Dia de Los Muertos begins. It is a significant day on the Mexican calendar, and a holiday that is widely misunderstood in the United States.… Mexican Food Chicken with Pipian Rojo Day Of The Dead Recipe European Print This
Nutrition facts: 200 Calories estimated 20 grams Fat estimated
Rating: 5.0/5
( 1 voted )

Ingredients

  • For the chicken
  • 1 whole chicken, cut up, bone in, skin on
  • 1/2 medium white onion
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon dried marjoram
  • 1 tablespoon dried thyme
  • For the sauce:
  • 6 dried guajillo or 3 ancho chiles, seeded, deveined, torn into pieces
  • 1 tablespoon lard or vegetable oil
  • 1 thick slice white onion
  • 3 large garlic cloves, halved
  • 5 or 6 cups chicken broth (from cooking the chicken), divided
  • 1/2 teaspoon powdered cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon paprika
  • Salt to taste, about 1/2 teaspoon
  • 2/3 cup pumpkin seeds (pepitas)
  • 1/4 cup almonds
  • 3 tablespoons sesame seeds

Instructions

Put chicken in large sturdy pot and cover with water, about 6 cups. Add onion, garlic, bay leaf, salt, marjoram and thyme. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to a bare simmer. Cook over low heat about 1 hour.

Remove chicken pieces. Strain broth through a fine mesh sieve. Refrigerate both if preparing ahead, up to one day. If desired, remove skin and bones from chicken before adding to sauce.

Make the sauce: To prepare chiles, cut off the stem and open them with scissors. Carefully remove all seeds and veins, and tear into pieces.

In 1 tablespoon lard or oil, saute onion and garlic in a large saucepan until translucent. Add chiles and gently saute until they just soften, less than a minute. (Don't overdo it.)

Add 2 cups chicken broth, cumin, paprika and salt. Bring to a boil, lower heat, and simmer gently 15 minutes. While this simmers, prepare nuts and seeds. Toast pumpkin seeds in a skillet over low heat just until they start to pop. Remove from heat.

Toast almonds in the same skillet until barely brown. Remove from heat. Toast sesame seeds until they just start to pop and are toasty brown. Remove from heat.

In a spice/coffee grinder, a food processor or blender, grind the pumpkin seeds to a fine powder. Transfer to a bowl.

Place sesame seeds and almonds in the blender and grind together until they are powdery. Transfer to another bowl, separate from the pumpkin seed powder.

When chiles and broth have finished simmering, put in blender or food processor and blend until smooth. Pour through a fine mesh sieve back into the same pot. Add 1 cup chicken broth and bring back to a boil. Whisk in the almond/sesame powder and cook over low heat 8 minutes. Whisk in the pumpkin seed powder and the rest of the broth, about 3-1/2 cups. Bring back to a boil, then reduce heat and cook gently until sauce thickens, about 10 minutes.

Taste for salt. Remove half the sauce and reheat chicken pieces in the pot. Serve the extra sauce on the side, or use for another dish. Reheat very gently on low.

Dia de Los Muertos dates back 3,000 years and began with Aztecs honoring of the dead, then evolved after Catholicism arrived in the region. It coincides with the Catholic feast days of All Souls Day and All Saints Day. Families celebrate by visiting ancestors in cemeteries, cleaning tombs, building decorations and picnicking as mariachis stroll around. The magic of the candle-lit, flower-bedecked cemeteries, particularly in Oaxaca, draws tourists from all over the world.

Special foods enjoyed by loved ones are prepared for the ofrenda. Other common foods are the Mexican celebration dishes, such as mole and tamales. Fruit, vegetables and sweets are typical. Loquats, or Japanese plums, have become popular in Mexico and are in season this time of the year, and frequently decorate ofredas. Candied pumpkin, calabaza en tacha, is a popular sweet, made from huge green pumpkins grown for this purpose.

 

Special foods enjoyed by loved ones are prepared for the ofrenda. Other common foods are the Mexican celebration dishes, such as mole and tamales. Fruit, vegetables and sweets are typical. Loquats, or Japanese plums, have become popular in Mexico and are in season this time of the year, and frequently decorate ofredas. Candied pumpkin, calabaza en tacha, is a popular sweet, made from huge green pumpkins grown for this purpose.

 

read more at nola.com

Follow the Link for Pan de Muerto, Bread of the Dead

Pan de Muerto, Bread of the Dead

or go Greek with this Moussaka 

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